THE PRONOUN

THE PRONOUN

 A pronoun is a word that stands in place of a noun. It has the same function as a noun. Pronouns also have number (singular or plural). Person (1st, 2nd, 3rd). Gender (masculine, feminine, neuter or common) and case (nominative, objective or possesive).

            There are three persons: 1st person, 2nd person, 3rd person, depending on whether the pronoun represents the person speaking, the person spoken to, or the person spoken about.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1st person

Person speaking

 

SINGULAR

PLURAL

Nominative

Pronouns

Used as

Subjects

 

I

Objective

Pronouns

Used as

Objects

 

Me

Possesive

Pronouns

That show

Ownership

 

Mine

Nominative

Pronouns

Used as

Subjects

 

We

Objective

Pronouns

Used as

Objects

 

Us

Possesive

Pronouns

That show

Ownership

 

Ours

2nd person

Person spoken to

You You Yours You You Yours
3rd person

Person spoken about

He

She

It

Him

Her

It

His

Hers

Its

They

They

Those

Them

Them

Them

Theirs

Theirs

Theirs

 

 TYPES OF PRONOUNS

  1. Personal Pronoun.

Personal pronouns stand instead of nouns reffering to persons. Personal pronouns are used as the subject of the verb (see the table).

I, you, he, she, it, we, they.

            Marry has a long way to go so she travels to school by car.

Note: a personal pronoun is used to replace a noun if the same noun is repeated in the sentence or paragraph we are writing.

  1. Relative Pronouns.

Relative pronouns introduce clauses and relate them back to the noun to which they apply.

            Who, whom, whose, that, which

Please Note: When reffering to people, always use who or whom.

In the nominative case (used as the subject of the verb), who, that and which should be used.

In the objective case (used as the object of the verb), whom, that and which should be used.

In the possesive case (showing ownership), whose and which are used.

  1. Possesive Pronouns.

Possesive pronouns indicate ownership or possession.

            Mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs

            These books are ours.

Note: NO apostrophe is used for these words.

  1. Demonstrative Pronouns.

Demonstrative pronouns stand for and refer to a noun. These words can also be adjectives. Note the difference:

Adjective         : This peach is ripe.

Pronoun           : Did you know that?

Adjective         : Do yo know that girl?

Pronouns         : I prefer these to those.

This, that, these, those, one, none

She selected these; I think that is the best one.

  1. Interrogative Pronouns.

Interrogative pronouns introduce questions.

Who, whom, whose, which, what.

Who was it?

Whom old you see?

Whose book are you using?

Which one will you do?

What are you doing?

  1. Reflexive Pronouns.

Reflexive pronouns are used in the object or after a preposition and refer to the subject. They can also be used to emphasise a previous noun or pronouns.

Myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, yourselves, themselves.

Reflexive         : He hurt himself

            Emphasise       : I myself do not want to go to the party.

  1. Indefinite Pronouns.

Indefinite pronouns are substitutes for nouns that are vague and imply some action.

Everyone, everybody, nobody, anything, nothing, some, any, all, it.

It is cool toy.

Everyone should play some sport.

Nothing can be done.

  1. Distributive Pronouns.

Distributive pronouns are such when they are used without nouns.

Each, neither, either

Each of the girls was on her best behaviour.

Either would do.

Neither of the boys was injured.

  1. Reciprocal Pronouns.

Reciprocal Pronouns can be applied to these pronouns when used together.

Each other, one another

They liked each other tremendously.

 

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